About us!

We are Amisadai and Louisa Monger (aged 12 and 10). In 2010, we moved to Tanzania in Africa - look at the map below to see if you can find it! We hope you will enjoy reading about our adventures and looking at our photos! Please don't forget to send us a message too!



Tuesday, 20 September 2016

How Many Things Can You Use a Khanga For?

I have lots of cool pictures to show you! Since my last blog, lots of things have happened, so I have a lot to tell you!
Yep - it's me!
Over the summer holiday, Kathryn and Arron, our friends from England, came to visit us.

That's us!
We went with them to Tunza beach. I was jumping off the rock making silhouettes in the sunset. Unfortunately one time I jumped off the rock but I landed doing the splits which was painful as you could imagine.

Me jumping over the sunset!



Also while they were here, we (the girls) had a khanga fashion show! A khanga is a piece of colourful cloth with pretty patterns and also a Swahili proverb written on it.
A traditional Tanzanian khanga
Do you know that khangas have so many uses?

CAN YOU LIST SOME WAYS TO USE A KHANGA?
See how many ways you can think of and post them in the comments! Watch the next blog post and we can see how many uses there are!
Khanga try-ons
Khanga Fashion

We also had other visitors, Julian and David come to stay. With them we went to the Serengeti which was amazing! We saw everything except lions which was unusual. We were really excited to see a mother cheetah with her cubs. They were so cute!
Can you see the four cubs?
We stayed overnight at a place called Serengeti Stop-over. On the front of the door of the banda there is a picture of an animal. Amisadai and I were standing outside the door with our new Serengeti T-shirts, trying to be the animal that was on the door!
Pretty fierce
But we can also be sort of normal!
... and crazy
On the way home from the Serengeti, we stopped off on the side of the road for picnic lunch....



 

...and the cows wanted to join us!


 Here are some more random photos from our summer holiday...

Amisadai's feet are normally really dirty

Boat out to Saanane Island

Another Jumping Rock photo from Saanane!

Looking for monitor lizards with Arron

Our family relaaaaaaaaaaaxxxxing
 
Crossing the crocodile and hippo river in the Serengeti
(not good for people like me who don't like heights)
That's all from me!
Don't forget to think about what you can use a khanga for (and there's one clue in the picnic photo!)

And CLICK HERE for the answers to Amisadai's Bee Quiz!


Are you a Bee Expert?

Here are the answers to my Bee Quiz from the last blog post!

EASY BEE QUIZ ANSWERS!

1. What is a group of bees called?
A colony

2. Who is the leader of a group of bees?
The Queen

3. Name 2 products bees make.
Honey and wax

4. What do bees collect to make honey?
Pollen

5. What shape do bees store their honey in?
Hexagons

Beekeeping protective gear and smoker

HARDER BEE QUIZ!!

1. What gender are all worker bees?
Female

2. How do bees show other bees how to find food?
They do the waggle dance

3. What is uncapped honey called?
Nectar

4. Name 2 things that happen after a bee stings you.
1) The bee dies
2) It lets off a smell which the other bees pick up, telling them to sting you too, because you are a threat to the hive.

5. Name 2 things we can make from beeswax.
Candles, shoe polish, lip balm and salves, furniture polish

HOW DID YOU DO?

Thursday, 1 September 2016

Bees and a Bee Quiz!

The past two weeks we have been as busy as bees... with bees! So I thought I would give you all a Bee Quiz (see below!)

We have harvested honey from several different places, which has been quite exciting! Our honey is dark, which means it has a stronger flavour. The taste and colour of the honey depends on what the bees forage for. Our bees like the mango trees, which have loads of pollen.

Bees can make their homes in many different kinds of places! In trees, in hives, in logs, in the eaves of houses (the roof), even in tires! And we even had a colony of stingless bees dangling from our dining room windowsill!

I got to help harvest honey and wax from two hives up on top of a container. It was awesome, and very fun. We got a fair bit of honey and mum was bee-side herself with joy! We took the bucket of honeycomb home to filter the honey through into a clean bucket. Then we processed the wax by putting the whole lot of comb left over in boiling water, straining it through a sack and then cooling it down until the wax settled on top of the water.
Here is me climbing up onto the container!
No one fell off!

Here is Louisa all dressed up in the gear and ready to go!
While the others were in the process of harvesting honey in a village called Malya, I got stung! A random bee flew to where I was standing! Look at my face!
You can't really see very well in this picture, but my face was quite swollen!

Bee keeping, in my opinion, is a very good business. It is fun to plan, to harvest and process... and very sweet to eat! We all enjoy that bit!

Yummy!
Just like Winnie the Pooh!

Honey straight off the honeycomb!


Here are some quizzes for you. There is an easier one and a harder one. You can post your answers in the comments below.

EASY BEE QUIZ!!!

1. What is a group of bees called?
2. Who is the leader of a group of bees?
3. Name 2 products bees make.
4. What do bees collect to make honey?
5. What shape do bees store their honey in?

HARDER BEE QUIZ!!

1. What gender are all worker bees?
2. How do bees show other bees how to find food?
3. What is uncapped honey called?
4. Name 2 things that happen after a bee stings you.
5. Name 2 things we can make from bee's wax.

 I will post the answers in my next blog.

BEE FACTS!!!

  • A hive will produce up to 500 pounds of honey a year.
  • Antarctica is the only continent in the world that doesn't have any bees.
  • Only drones can mate with the queen
  • There are three kinds of honey bees: worker bees, drones and the queen
  • It takes the nectar of over 1 million of flowers to make 1 pound of honey
Do you know any other interesting bee facts?
Or have any questions about bees?
 

Tuesday, 26 July 2016

Summer Camp! Summer Camp! Oi!

Last week it was Summer Camp for lots of kids with albinism! This was our camp shout: SUMMER CAMP! SUMMER CAMP! And everyone shouts "OI!" A team of volunteers came to run the camp. It was sad that Amisadai was sick a lot of the week, but I went every day from Tuesday to Sunday and really enjoyed it! The volunteers and Vicky and Esther made it really fun for all the kids - they were all very patient and kind! I got to go to a camp in Kenya the week before, but these kids don't get to do things like this, so this was a really exciting treat! Also it is their school holiday but a lot of them don't have a safe or happy home to go to which is really sad for them, so this made everyone very happy!

I went round the different stations joining in with different groups. I also helped with the little children in day care a few times. Here are some of the things we did ...

Art class with Maria (Mama Penina's daughter)
With Mama Laurensia
Emmanuel Festo has been through a very hard life. When he was 7 years old,  his left arm and the fingers on his right hand were cut off. Later on, he went to America where doctors used his toe to make a thumb so that he could grip with his right hand.  I don't know how they did this. But having only two "fingers" it is still very hard to hold a pencil. I was so surprised to see how he drew this amazing tree with the stubs on his hand wedged against chin! I could not do that!

Emmanuel drawing

 

I enjoyed going to the science class! We were learning about what we can do to avoid getting burned by the sun. People with albinism don't have pigment to protect their skin, so they can easily get skin damage and cancer from the sun rays. So one of the things the teachers did was give out these bead bracelets, which are really cool! When you stand in the sun, (mainly between 11am and 4pm when the sun rays are strongest), the beads change colour from white to purple, going darker purple as the sun rays get stronger. They draw energy from the sun which later makes them glow green in the dark! This helped us all week to see when we needed to get out of the sun!
Here we are all trying out our bracelets!
This kid needs to get out of the sun! Her beads have gone purple!
Ashley and Brady, young people from Canada, were leading the sports station! We played hockey and other games. That was a little hard with my sore hand, but they made it loads of fun.
Playing hockey!
The Upenda wa Mama group were selling necklaces, earrings, lip balms, lots of different types of body balms, lots of different types of soap, candles and hand sewn cards. Here I am helping them to set up the stall and help with selling. Lots of the team wanted to buy things and all the kids liked to look at it all!
This cute little girl is Mama Zuena's daughter, Mariam. I enjoyed looking after her!
At the end of every day, everyone came together for chapel. We sang worship songs and we can all dance at the front! Then some of the kids would perform a song and then there was a talk to do with our theme "I can do all things through Him who strengthens me." (Philippians 4:13) We also had a theme song which was really fun to sing and a really good thing for the kids who have had bad things said to them saying that they are not important or that they are a curse, to remember. It says, "I know who I am!" So you can see, it was very good camp.

Dancing in chapel


Saturday, 23 July 2016

Loving a Kids Life as an "Overseas Missionary"

Louisa and I just got back from an amazing camp in Kenya which we can’t wait to tell you all about! Also Louisa has lots to say about the awesome Summer Camp this week for Kids with Albinism. But we haven’t had time to write anything yet. So in the meantime, we thought you might like to read a short article we wrote for our Church magazine in England. We were asked to write about what it is like as kids growing up as “overseas missionaries.”

All Christians, young and old, wherever they live, can be missionaries. A missionary is someone who shares Jesus and the Bible with others, lives as a light and helps people practically and spiritually.
For us, being overseas missionaries (in a different country to where we were born) is fun and exciting, but can also sometimes be a little sad or hard at times ... and it can be pretty normal too.

Living Overseas

We love that we see get to see amazing places like the Serengeti, speak different languages (Swahili and tribal languages) and have different experiences. We have adventures that might scare people in England such accidently standing on a crocodile’s head in the river and just getting off in time or finding a spitting cobra living in our garden. We eat food that is really different to Canadians, like green slime with sour milk, hairy goats and cow intestine soup.
The green slime with rice
Learning Kimasai in Magozi
Snake kill
As well as being adventurous, it can be a little hard at times. We often miss our family and friends in England and Canada. Amisadai misses Taste Youth and corner yogurts and Louisa misses English shops and McDonalds. But then when we come back to England we really miss our friends and life in Tanzania and we feel so behind because everyone is talking about new things that just came out, and we have NO clue what they are talking about. Tanzania is home to us, and we feel normal here!

In many ways normal life for us isn’t so different! We get up at 6:20am and leave for school at 7:15am. School starts at 7:55am. We go to an international school (taught in English). We really like it there, and it isn’t that different to UK schools. Amisadai’s favourite subjects are PE, History and Drama and Louisa’s favourites are art and science. We have loads of monkeys at our school, and they are a nuisance! They tip over the bins, steal lunches and break into students’ backpacks. Once a friend walked into the bathroom and found a monkey sitting on the toilet! After school, sometimes we have swimming or other clubs, or we go home and do homework and music practise. We like to do normal things like riding our bikes, going for runs, climbing trees (and playing in our treehouse), listening to music, sketching and emailing friends.
Singing in the school choir

Fun in our treehouse
 

How are we as kids involved in “Mission?”

Sometimes people think only adults can be missionaries. But we all can. Most of our time is at school now, so we can talk to friends about Jesus and what it means to be a Christian. When we go to villages, the main thing is to be with people. They love to see our faces and we love to help out! When we were doing the stoves project, we would sit with the groups and make miniature versions of clay stoves! We can sit and make beads or weave mats with mamas and play games with kids. When mum and dad go to teach about nutrition or SODIS (a way of getting clean water to drink using sunlight) or keeping bees, we can talk too and act out dramas to help deliver the message.


Teaching how to get clean water using SODIS
Teaching the importance of washing hands!
Hanging out with the Mamas Group
Teaching on protective bee-gear
Louisa loves to read the Swahili Bible and lead the singing. And we get to see that God is always at work! God has always been there for us, to help and encourage us, getting us out of danger and healing us from sicknesses such as malaria and amoebiasis. Once when we got lost in a baobab forest with a friend, after wandering round in circles and making our parents rather anxious, He brought us all back to the path. We have seen God heal people who have evil spirits and He has given Louisa the words to pray for people.  He always has a special job for all of us to do!

How have you seen God at work around you?

Sunday, 26 June 2016

Serengeti to Home (Part 3)

Waking up on Day 4 to the sunrise of the Serengeti, we all washed, dressed and ate, and we were soon on our way back through the Serengeti again. On our last game drive we saw more and more animals, including a very well camouflaged leopard! We drove through a huge herd of zebras and wildebeest and made our way back to the Serengeti gate. We quickly stopped for lunch before returning home to Mwanza, full of happy memories … and looking forward to seeing our families again!

We had a lot of fun during the trip! It was funny when someone’s hat blew off his head, out the open-top roof and landed on the road behind us. The car behind picked it up for us! We had a lot of chatter and giggling on the long car journeys. But after many hours on the road with one girl in particular, one boy said that she needed to “talk MODERATELY!” It was fun sleeping in tents but the food wasn’t as good as home food. I enjoyed a chance to be with different friends. I loved seeing all the animals and the new beautiful landscapes. I can’t wait to take my family there!
Tenting Fun

So, as you can see it was a good, educational and very fun trip! I hope you have learnt something too about Ngorongoro Crater and Oldupai Gorge and can picture the wonderful time we had there.

Glossary
Fossil: a bone that has been preserved for a long period of time.

Ngorongoro: the sound of the cow and donkey bells as they walk down into the crater.
Serengeti: this word comes from the Masai word “Serengiti” which means “endless plains”.

Oldupai: a word from the Masai language for a certain plant called Sisal which grows plentifully in and around Oldupai Gorge. It is used by the Masai to make ropes, baskets and mats. Cows chew it when there is little water around as the plant absorbs water. It is also used in medicine as it is a painkiller.
Sisal
Total List of Animals Seen
Elephant
Giraffe
Impala
Thompson’s gazelle
Topi
Black rhino
Cheetah
Lion
Leopard
Warthog
Hyenas
Wildebeest
Buffalo
Ostrich
Dik dik
Zebra
Vultures
Guinea fowl
Baboon
Monkey
Jackal